BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

BREAST CANCER FACTS

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women.

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women.

Each year it is estimated that over 246,660 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die.

Although breast cancer in men is rare, an estimated 2,600 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 440 will die each year.

On average, every 2 minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer and 1 woman will die of breast cancer every 13 minutes.

Over 2.8 million breast cancer survivors are alive in the United States today.

Breast cancer incidence rates are highest in non-Hispanic white women, followed by African American women and are lowest among Asian/Pacific Islander women. In contrast, breast cancer death rates are highest for African American women, followed by non-Hispanic white women. Breast cancer death rates are lowest for Asian/Pacific Islander women. Breast cancer incidence and death rates also vary by state.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF BREAST CANCER?

Breast cancer typically produces no symptoms when the tumor is small and most easily treated. Therefore, it is very important for women to follow recommended screening guidelines for detecting breast cancer at an early stage. When breast cancer has grown to a size that can be felt, the most common physical sign is a painless lump. Sometimes breast cancer can spread to underarm lymph nodes and cause a lump or swelling, even before the original breast tumor is large enough to be felt. Less common signs and symptoms include breast pain or heaviness; persistent changes to the breast, such as swelling, thickening, or redness of the breast’s skin; and nipple abnormalities such as spontaneous discharge (especially if bloody), erosion, or retraction. It is important to note that pain (or lack thereof) does not indicate the presence or the absence of breast cancer. Any persistent change in the breast should be evaluated by a physician as soon as possible. (Source: http://www.cancer.org)

FIVE LITTLE KNOWN FACTS ABOUT BREAST CANCER (Source: facts.randomhistory.com)

The youngest known survivor of breast cancer is Aleisha Hunter from Ontario, Canada. At only three years old, Aleisha underwent a complete mastectomy in 2010 to treat her juvenile strain of breast cancer.

The left breast is statistically more prone to developing cancer than the right breast. Scientists are unsure why.

When breast cancer spreads beyond the breast, it is said to be “metastatic.” The most common places breast cancer spreads to are the bones, liver, and lungs.

Risk factors for male breast cancer include age, BRCA gene mutations, Klinefelter’s syndrome, testicular disorders, a family history of female breast cancer, severe liver disease, radiation exposure, being treated with estrogen-related drugs, and obesity.

One myth about breast cancer is that a person’s risk is increased only when there are affected relatives on the mother’s side of the family. However, the father’s side of the family is equally important in assessing breast cancer risk.

@Bakari79

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